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QUIZ



MY LOVE OF NATURE, goes right back to my childhood, to the times when I stayed on, my grandparents' farm in Suffolk. My father was in the armed forces, so we were always moving and didn't have a home base for any length of time, but I loved going there. I think it was my grandmother who encouraged me more than anyone: she taught me the names of wild flowers and got me interested in looking at the countryside, so it seemed obvious to go on to do Zoology at University.
I didn't get my first camera until after I'd graduated, when I was due to go diving in Norway and needed a method of recording the sea creatures I would find there. My father didn't know anything about photography, but he bought me an Exacta, which was really quite a good camera for the time, and I went off to take my first pictures of sea anemones and starfish. I became keen very quickly, and learned how to develop and print; obviously I didn't have much money in those days, so I did more black and white photography than colour, but it was all still using the camera very much as a tool to record what I found both by diving and on the shore. I had no ambition at all to be a photographer then, or even for some years afterwards. Unlike many of the wildlife photographers of the time, I trained as a scientist and therefore my way of expressing myself is very different. I've tried from the beginning to produce pictures which are -always biologically correct. There are people who will alter things deliberately: you don't pick up sea creatures from the middle of the shore and take them down to attractive pools at the bottom of the shore without knowing you're doing it. In so doing you're actually falsifying the sort of seaweeds they live on and so on, which may seem unimportant, but it is actually changing the natural surroundings to make them prettier. Unfortunately, many of the people who select pictures are looking for attractive images and, at the end of the day, whether it's truthful or not doesn't really matter to them.
SItE'si he animal first, and there are many occasions when I've not taken a picture because it would have been too disturbing. Nothing is so important that you have to get that shot; of course, there are cases when it would be very sad if you didn't, but it's not the end of the world. There can be a lot of ignorance in people's behaviour towards wild animals and it's a problem that more and more people are going to wild places: while some animals may get used to cars, they won't get used to people suddenly rushing up to them. The sheer pressure of people, coupled with the fact that there are increasingly fewer places where no-one else has photographed, means that over the years, life has become much more difficult for the professional wildlife photographer.
Nevertheless, wildlife photographs play a very important part in educating people about what is out there and what needs conserving. Although photography can be an enjoyable pastime, as it is to many people, it is also something that plays a very important part in educating young and old alike. Of the qualities it takes to make a good wildlife photographer, patience is perhaps the most obvious - you just have to be prepared to sit it out. I'm actually more patient now because I write more than ever before, and as long as I've got a bit of paper and a pencil, I don't feel I'm wasting my time. And because I photograph such a wide range of things, even if the main target doesn't appear I can probably find something else to concentrate on instead.


  Question 1

The writer decided to go to university and study Zoology because

A : she wanted to improve her life in the countryside
B : she was persuaded to do so by her grandmother
C : she was keen on the natural world
D : she wanted to stop moving around all the time


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     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 2

    Why did she get her first camera ?

    A : she needed to be able to look back at what she had seen
    B : she wanted to find out if she enjoyed photography
    C : her father thought it was a good idea for her to have one
    D : she wanted to learn how to use one and develop her own prints


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 3

    She did more black and white photography than colour because

    A : she did not like colour photograph
    B : she did not have a good camera
    C : she wanted quality photograph
    D : she didn't have much money in those days


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 4

    How is she different from some of the other wildlife photographers she meets ?

    A : she tries to make her photographs as attractive as possible
    B : she takes photographs which record accurate natural conditions
    C : she likes to photograph plants as well as wildlife
    D : she knows the best places to find wildlife


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     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 5

    Which does 'them' refer to in the 7"' line in paragraph 3?

    A : sea creatures
    B : attractive pools
    C : seaweeds
    D : Natural surroundings


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 6

    What the writer means by 'ignorance in people's behaviour' is

    A : altering things deliberately
    B : people suddenly rushing up to animals
    C : people taking photographs of wild animals
    D : people not thinking about the animals in the first place


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 7

    The writer now finds it more difficult to photograph wild animals because

    A : there are fewer of them
    B : they have become more nervous of people
    C : it is harder to find suitable places
    D : they have become frightened of cars


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 8

    Wildlife photography is important because it can make people realise that

    A : photography is an enjoyable hobby
    B : we learn little about wildlife at school
    C : it is worthwhile visiting the countryside
    D : wildlife photographs educate people about wild animals


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 9

    Why is she more patient now ?

    A : she does other things while waiting
    B : she has got used to waiting
    C : she can concentrate better than she used to
    D : she knows the result will be worth it


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     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 10

    Which of the following describes the writer?

    A : pound
    B : sensitive
    C : aggressive
    D : disanointed


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    .

     Correct answer is : A


  • PART - B

    Instructions: Three of the four words given below are spelt wrongly. Select the word that is spelt correctly


      Question 11

    Correctly spelled word is

    A : acquintence
    B : acquaintence
    C : acquaintance
    D : acquintance


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 12

    Correctly spelled word is

    A : neglegense
    B : neglegence
    C : negligance
    D : negligence


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 13

    Correctly spelled word is

    A : grevance
    B : greivance
    C : grievance
    D : grievence


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 14

    Correctly spelled word is

    A : heirarchical
    B : hierarchical
    C : hierarchical
    D : heirarchical


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 15

    Correctly spelled word is

    A : garanter
    B : garantor
    C : guaranter
    D : guarantor


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    .

     Correct answer is : D


  • PART - C
    Instructions: Select the best option from the four alternatives


      Question 16

    They live on a busy road……………….. a lot of noise from the traffic.

    A : It must be
    B : It must have
    C : There must have
    D : There must be


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 17

    The more electricity you use,…………………………

    A : your bill will be higher
    B : will be higher your bill
    C : the higher your bill will be
    D : higher your bill will be


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 18

    Ben likes walking…………………………..

    A : Every morning he walks to work
    B : He walks to work every morning
    C : He walks every morning to work
    D : He every morning walks to work


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     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 19

    It's two years……………Sophy

    A : that I don't see
    B : that I haven't seen
    C : since I didn't see
    D : since I last saw


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     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 20

    What was the problem ? Why………………..leave early ?

    A : have you to
    B : did you have to
    C : must you
    D : you had to


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     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 21

    Nobody believed Arun at first, but he…………. to be right.

    A : worked out
    B : came out
    C : found out
    D : turned out


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     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 22

    We can't…………… making a decision. We have to decide now.

    A : put away
    B : put over
    C : put off
    D : put out


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     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 23

    The accident was my fault, so I had to pay for the damage…...the other bar.

    A : of
    B : for
    C : to
    D : on


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     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 24

    I really ............ object people smoking in my house.

    A : to
    B : about
    C : for
    D : on


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     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 25

    A contract may be…………if the court finds there has been misinterpretation of the facts.'

    A : restrained
    B : rescinded
    C : compelled
    D : conferred


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     Correct answer is : B


  • PART – D
    Instructions: The five paragraphs given below have all had their constituent sentences jumbled. Read each jumbled passage carefully and then pick the option in which the best sequence is shown


      Question 26

    UNIT I
    i) The Supertag scanner could revolutionise the way people shop, virtually eradicating supermarket queues;
    ii) The face of retailing will change even more rapidly when the fibre optic networks being built by cable TV companies begin to be more widely used;
    iii) The scanner would have a double benefit for supermarkets - removing the bottleneck which causes frustration to most customers and reducing the number of checkout staff;
    iv) An electronic scanner which can read the entire contents of a supermarket trolley at a glance has just been developed.
    The best sequence is:


    A : ii, i, iii, iv
    B : iv, i, iii, ii
    C : iv, iii i, i
    D : iii, i, iv, ii


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 27

    UNIT II
    i) Of course, modern postal services now are much more sophisticated and faster, relying as they do on motor vehicles and planes for delivery.
    ii) Indeed, the ancient Egyptians had a system for sending letters from about 2000 BC, as did the Zhou dynasty in China a thousand years later.
    iii) Letters, were, and are, sent by some form of postal service, the history of which goes back a long way.
    iv) For centuries, the only form of written correspondence was the letter.
    The best sequence is:


    A : ii, i, iii, iv
    B : iv, i, iii, ii
    C : iv, iii, ii, i
    D : iii, i, iv, ii


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     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 28

    UNIT III
    i) Converting money into several currencies in the course of one trip can also be quite expensive, given that banks and bureaux de change charge commission on the transaction.
    ii) Trying to work out the value of the various notes and .coins can be quite a strain, particularly if you are visiting more than one country.
    iii) Travel can be very exciting, but it can also be rather complicated. iv) One of these complications is, undoubtedly, foreign currency.
    The best sequence is:


    A : ii, i, iii, iv
    B : iv, i, iii, ii
    C : iv, iii, ii, i
    D : iii, iv, ii, i


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     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 29

    UNIT IV
    i) She was right about three-curiosity, freckles, and doubt-but wrong about love.
    ii) "Four of the things I'd be better without: Love, curiosity, freckles,and doubt".
    iii) Love is indispensable in life.
    iv) So wrote Dorothy Parker, the American writer.
    The best sequence is:


    A : ii, iv, i, iii
    B : ii, i, iii, iv
    C : ii, i, iv, iii
    D : iii, iv, i, ii


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 30

    UNIT V
    i) This clearly indicates that the brains of men and women are organised differently in the way they process speech.
    ii) Difference in the way men and women process language is of special interest to brain researchers.
    iii) However, women are more likely than men to suffer aphasia when the front part of the brain is damaged.
    iv) It has been known that aphasia - a kind of speech disorder - is more common in men than in women when the left side of the brain is damaged in an accident or after a stroke.
    The best sequence is:


    A : ii, i, iv, iii
    B : iv, i, iii, ii
    C : iv, iii, ii, i
    D : ii, iv, iii, i


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     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 31

    Choose the word, which is most opposite in meaning of the word, printed in bold as used in the passage Deleterious.

    A : Beneficial
    B : Harmfu
    C : Irreparable
    D : Non-cognizable


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 32

    The author's most important objective of writing the above passage seems to

    A : Highlight the use of nuclear weapons as an effective population control measures.
    B : Illustrate the devastating effects of use of nuclear weapons on mankind.
    C : Duly highlight the supremacy of the nations which possess nuclear weapons.
    D : Summarise the long biological effects of use of nuclear weapons.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 33

    The scientists engaged in manufacturing destructive weapons are

    A : Very few in number
    B : Irresponsible and incompetent
    C : More than half of the total number
    D : Engaged in the armaments industry against their desire


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 34

    According to the passage, the argument on use and manufacture of nuclear weapons

    A : Does not stand the test of legality
    B : Possesses legal strength although it does not have moral standing
    C : Is acceptable only on moral grounds
    D : Becomes stronger if legal and moral considerations are combined


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 35

    The author of the passage seems to be of the view that

    A : Utilization of scientific skills in manufacture of weapons is appropriate.
    B : Manufacture of weapons of death would help eradication of poverty.
    C : Spending money on manufacture of weapons may be justifiable subject to the availability of funds.
    D : Utilization of valuable knowledge for manufacture of lethal weapons is inhuman.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 36

    Which of the following is one of the consequences of nuclear war?

    A : Fertility of land will last for a year or so
    B : Post-war survivors being very few will have abundant food.
    C : Lights would be cooler and more comfortable.
    D : Southern Hemisphere would remain quite safe in the post-war period.


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 37

    Which of the following best explains the word devoted, as used in the passage?

    A : Dedicated for a good cause
    B : Utilised for betterment
    C : Abused for destruction
    D : Under-utilised


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 38

    The biological consequences of nuclear war as given in the passage include all the following, except

    A : Fall in temperature below zero degree Celsius.
    B : Ultraviolet radiation
    C : High does of ionizing
    D : Abundant food for smaller population.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 39

    It appears from the passage that the use of nuclear weapons is considered against morality by

    A : Only such of those nations who cannot afford to manufacture and sell weapons
    B : Almost all the nations of the world
    C : Only the superpowers who can afford to manufacture and sell weapons
    D : Most of the scientists devote their valuable skills to manufacture nuclear weapons.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 40

    Which of the following statements I, II, III and IV is definitely true in the context of the passage?
    (I) There is every likelihood of survival of the human species as a consequence of nuclear war.
    (II) Nuclear war risks and harmful effects are highly exaggerated.
    (III) The post war survivors would be exposed to the benefits of non-lethal radiation.
    (IV) Living organisms in the areas which are not directly affected by nuclear was would also suffer


    A : I
    B : III
    C : II
    D : I


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 41

    Select the word that is spelt correct

    A : renaissance
    B : renaisance
    C : renaissence
    D : renaisence


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 42

    Select the word that is spelt correct

    A : malaese
    B : melaize
    C : melaise
    D : malaise


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 43

    Select the word that is spelt correct

    A : irelevant
    B : irrelevent
    C : irrelevant
    D : irrellevant


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 44

    Select the word that is spelt correct

    A : survilance
    B : surveillance
    C : surveilance
    D : surveilliance


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 45

    Select the word that is spelt correct

    A : gaiety
    B : gaietty
    C : gaeity
    D : gaitty


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 46

    Given below is a foreign language phrase that is commonly used. Choose the correct meaning of the phrase
    Mala fide


    A : in good faith
    B : in bad faith
    C : without any faith
    D : with full faith


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 47

    Given below is a foreign language phrase that is commonly used. Choose the correct meaning of the phrase
    Pro rata


    A : at the rate of
    B : at quoted rate
    C : in proportion
    D : beyond all proportion


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 48

    Given below is a foreign language phrase that is commonly used. Choose the correct meaning of the phrase
    Vice versa


    A : in verse
    B : versatile verse
    C : in consonance with
    D : the other way round


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     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 49

    Given below is a foreign language phrase that is commonly used. Choose the correct meaning of the phrase
    Ab initio


    A : from the very beginning
    B : high initiative
    C : things done later
    D : without initiative


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 50

    Given below is a foreign language phrase that is commonly used. Choose the correct meaning of the phrase
    Alibi


    A : every where
    B : else where
    C : no where
    D : without any excuse


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 51

    The idiom given below is commonly used. Choose its correct meaning
    To give the game away


    A : To lose the game
    B : To give a walk-over in a game
    C : To reveal the secret
    D : To play the game badly


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 52

    The idiom given below is commonly used. Choose its correct meaning
    To cool one's heels


    A : To close the chapter
    B : To walk on the heels
    C : To kick someone with the heels
    D : To wait and rest for some time


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 53

    The idiom given below is commonly used. Choose its correct meaning
    To bury the hatchet


    A : To fight with the hatchet
    B : To forget the enmity
    C : To bury the treasure under ground
    D : To pick up enmity


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 54

    The idiom given below is commonly used. Choose its correct meaning
    Gift of the gab


    A : Gift for hard work
    B : Gift undeserved
    C : Gift of being a good conversationalist
    D : Gift from unknown person


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 55

    The idiom given below is commonly used. Choose its correct meaning
    To smell a rat


    A : To suspect a trick
    B : To detect a foul smell
    C : To behave like a rat
    D : To trust blindly


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 56

    Some people believe that in emotional maturity men are inferior……………..…women.

    A : Than
    B : To
    C : From
    D : Against


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 57

    My father was annoyed ……….me.

    A : Towards
    B : Against
    C : With
    D : Upon


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 58

    Some orthodox persons are averse………. drinking liquor.

    A : Against
    B : For
    C : Towards
    D : To


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 59

    The Cinema Hall was on fire and the Cinema owner had to send the……. Fire Brigade.

    A : For
    B : Through
    C : Off
    D : In


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 60

    He was not listening………… I was saying.

    A : That
    B : Which
    C : To what
    D : What


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    .

     Correct answer is : C


  • Fill in the blanks in questions I to 5

      Question 61

    Slavery was not done away _______.until the last century

    A : with
    B : for
    C : to
    D : off


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 62

    Does he not take _______ his father?

    A : before
    B : for
    C : after
    D : like


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 63

    We will have to take _______more staff if we're to take on more work

    A : up
    B : onto
    C : into
    D : on


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 64

    Mother takes everything in her-.

    A : steps
    B : face
    C : stride
    D : work


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 65

    Sale have really taken-now.

    A : up
    B : on
    C : of
    D : off


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    .

     Correct answer is : C


  • The constituent phrases of a sentence are jumbled up in question no. 6 -8.Select the most appropriate sequence to make the sentence meaningful.

      Question 66

    (i) built on the site of a church destroyed(ii) in the hilly area of the city is the famous Shandon Steeple(iii) the bell tower of St. Anne's Church(iv) when the city was besieged by the Duke of Marlborough

    A : ii, iii ,i, iv
    B : ii, i, iii, iv
    C : iv, iii, i , ii
    D : iii, ii, i, iv


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 67

    (i) no law giving effect to the policy of the state towards securing all or any of the principles laid in part IV(ii) notwithstanding anything contained in Article 13(iii) and no law containing a declaration that it is for giving effect to such policy shall be called in question in any court on the ground that it does not give effect to such policy(iv) shall be deemed to be void on the ground that it is inconsistent with or takes away or abridges any of the rights conferred by Article 14 or 19

    A : ii j , iii, iv
    B : iv,i,ii,iii
    C : ii, i, iv, iii
    D : i,ii,iii,iv


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 68

    (i) neither House shall proceed further with the Bill,(ii) if he does so, the houses shall meet accordingly(iii) but the President may at any time after the date of his notification summon the Houses to meet in ajoint silting for the purpose specified in the notification and,(iv) where the President has under clause (I) ractified his intention of summoning theHouses to meet in a joint sitting,

    A : iv, i , iii, ii
    B : iv, i , ii, iii
    C : iv, ii, iii, i
    D : i, ii, iii, iv


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    .

     Correct answer is : A


  • Substitute the underlined phrases with any of the given choices to express the opposite meaning in the sentences in questions number 9 – 11

      Question 69

    She always praises everything I say .

    A : picks holes in
    B : dislikes
    C : rebukes
    D : picks holes to


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 70

    He often says how wonderful his school is?

    A : says he is unworthy
    B : appreciates
    C : runs up
    D : runs down


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 71

    She said I was the best boss they'd ever had. It was obvious she was praising me sincerely.

    A : not appreciating me
    B : befooling me
    C : buttering me up
    D : disliking me


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    .

     Correct answer is : B


  • Identity the part of speech of the underlined words in the given sentences from Questions number 12 to 14

      Question 72

    I must perfect the operation to make the perfect robot.

    A : verb
    B : adverb
    C : adjective
    D : noun


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 73

    A kindly person is one who behaves kindly.

    A : noun
    B : preposition
    C : adverb
    D : verb


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 74

    He is not normally a very fast runner, but he runs fast in major events.

    A : adverb
    B : adjective
    C : verb
    D : noun


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : A


  • Read the following passage carefully and answer question numbers 15 to 24 Anligone was one of the daughters of Oedipus, that tragic figure of male power who had been cursed by Gods for mistakenly killing his father and subsequently marrying his mother and assuming the throne of Thebes. After the death of Oedipus civil war broke out and a battle was waged in front of the seventh gale of Thebes- his two sons led opposing factions and al the height of the battle fought and killed each other. Oedipus’ brother, Creon, uncle oCAnligone, was now undisputed master of the city. Creon resolved to make an example of the brother who had fought against him, Polynices, by refusing the right of honourable burial. The penalty of death was promulgated against any who should defy this order. Antigone was distraught. Polynices had been left unburied, unwept, a feast of flesh for keen eyed carrion birds. Antigone asks her sister Ismene, for it was a challenge to her royal blood. “Now it is time to show weather or not you are worthy of your royal blood. Is he not my brother and yours? Whether you like it or not? I shall never desert him-never!” But Ismene responds, “How could you dare-when Creon has expressly forbidden it? Antigone, we are women, it is not for us to fight against men”. With a touch of bitterness, Antigone releases her sister from the obligation to help her, but argues she cannot shrug off the burden. “If I die for it what happiness! Live, if you will live, and defy the holiest of laws of heaven.”

      Question 75

    What is the main theme of the story of Mtigone?

    A : One must be truthful and honest
    B : There is a conflict between the laws of men and heavenly laws
    C : One must be true to one's kins
    D : War is an evil


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 76

    Why did Antigone decide to defy the orders of Creon?

    A : She loved her brother
    B : She was to give an honorable burial to her brother
    C : She felt she was bound by her heavenly obligation
    D : To teach Creon a lesson


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 77

    What, in your opinion, would have been the logical end of the story?

    A : Antigone might have agreed with her sister and refrained from giving a burial to Polynices
    B : Antigone might have been allowed by Creon to give a decent burial to her brother
    C : Antigone might have defied the order of Creon but forgiven by him
    D : Antigone might have been executed for defying the order of the king


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 78

    What was the status of women in the contemporary society? They

    A : were liberated
    B : could have taken their own decisions
    C : considered themselves inferior and subordinate to men
    D : claimed equality with men


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 79

    Why did a civil war break out in Thcbcs? The war broke out because

    A : of the curse of the Gods
    B : the brothers of Antigone were greedy
    C : there was a fight among sons of Oedipus for the inheritance of the kingdom
    D : there was a conflict between a son of Oedipus and Creon


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 80

    A carrion bird is a bird

    A : of prey
    B : which eats human flesh
    C : which cats dead bodies
    D : which eats only grain


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 81

    Why did Creon deny decent burial to Polynices? He did so because

    A : he did not love Polynices
    B : Polynices fought against Creon
    C : Polynices was disobedient to Creon
    D : Polynices did not show bravery


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 82

    Why did Ismene not support Antigone? Ismene

    A : was weak and did not have the courage to defy orders of the powerful king
    B : did not consider it right to defy the kiag
    C : did not think it fit to defy her uncle especially after the death of her father
    D : did not believe that Polyr.ices deserved better treatment


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 83

    Why did the Gods curse Oedipus? Because Oedipus

    A : killed his father and married his mother
    B : killed his father
    C : married his mother
    D : committed an unknown sin


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 84

    Does the story approve the principle of vicarious liability? If so how?

    A : No, it does not
    B : Yes, it does, because of the acts of Oedipus his children suffered
    C : Yes, it does, because his father was killed by Oedipus
    D : Yes, it does, because he married his mother


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    .

     Correct answer is : B


  • Select the meaning of the underlined idioms and phrases in sentences in questions 25 to 30

      Question 85

    I have hit upon a good plan to get rid of him.

    A : found
    B : chanced upon
    C : decided to beat him
    D : borrowed


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 86

    He is sticking out for better terms.

    A : threatens to take action
    B : insists on using the force
    C : decides to give concessions
    D : persists in demanding


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 87

    He broke off in the middle of the story.

    A : failed
    B : began crying
    C : stopped suddenly
    D : felt uneasy


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 88

    He refused to be led by the nose.

    A : to follow like an animal
    B : to be treated as a fool
    C : to follow submissively
    D : to be heated violently


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 89

    The new cotton mill is mortgaged up to the eve.

    A : apparently
    B : completely
    C : deceptively
    D : actually


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 90

    When they embraced a new religion, it is safe to say they did it for loaves and fishes.

    A : selflessly
    B : honest reasons
    C : material benefits
    D : because of fear


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    .

     Correct answer is : C


  • Passage for Questions 1 to 10

    In 1954, a Bombay economist named A.D. Shroff began a Forum of Free Enterprise, whose ideas on economic development were somewhat at odds with those then influentially articulated by the Planning Commission of the Government of India. Shroff complained against the ‘indifference, if not discouragement’ with which the state treated entrepreneurs.

    At the same time as Shroff, but independently of him, a journalist named Philip Spratt was writing a series of essays in favour of free enterprise. Spratt was a Cambridge communist who was sent by the party in 1920s to foment revolution in the subcontinent. Detected in the act, he spent many years in an Indian jail. The books he read in the prison, and his marriage to an Indian woman afterwards, inspired a steady move rightwards. By the 1950s, he was editing a pro-American weekly from Bangalore, called MysIndia. There he inveighed against the economic policies of the government of India. These, he said, treated the entrepreneur ‘as a criminal who has dared to use his brains independently of the state to create wealth and give employment’. The state’s chief planner, P.C. Mahalanobis, had surrounded himself with Western leftists and Soviet academicians, who reinforced his belief in ‘rigid control by the government over all activities’. The result, said Spratt, would be ‘the smothering of free enterprise, a famine of consumer goods, and the tying down of millions of workers to soul-deadening techniques.’

    The voices of men like Spratt and Shroff were drowned in the chorus of popular support for a model of heavy industrialization funded and directed by the governments. The 1950s were certainly not propitious times for free marketers in India. But from time to time their ideas were revived. After the rupee was devalued in 1966, there were some moves towards freeing the trade regime, and hopes that the licensing system would also be liberalized. However, after Indira Gandhi split the Congress Party in 1969, her government took its ‘left turn’, nationalizing a fresh range of industries and returning to economic autarky.


      Question 91

    Which of the following statements can most reasonably be inferred from the information available in the passage:

    A : P.C. Mahalanobis believed in empowering private entrepreneurs and promoting free market.
    B : Philip Spratt preferred plans that would create economic conditions favourable for a forward march by the private enterprise.
    C : Restrictions on free markets enriched large Indian companies.
    D : Philip Spratt opposed the devaluation of rupee in 1966.


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 92

    Which of the following statements is least likely to be inferred from the passage.

    A : Acceptance of A.D. Shroff’s plans in the official circles smothered free enterprise in India.
    B : The views of the Forum of Free Enterprise ran against the conception of development then prevalent among the policy makers.
    C : A.D. Shroff believed that state should actively support the private sector.
    D : Philip Spratt had been educated in Cambridge.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 93

    Select the statement that best captures the central purpose of this passage.

    A : Highlight that even though there were advocates for free-market and private enterprise in the early years of independent India, they were crowded out by others who supported a dominant role for state
    B : Explain the politics behind Indira Gandhi’s decision to nationalize the banks.
    C : Demonstrate with the help of statistics how the preference of policy makers for Soviet-style economic policies prevented India’s economic growth.
    D : Establish that devaluation of rupee in 1966 was vindicated by subsequent experience.


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 94

    Philip Spratt came to India because he:

    A : Fell in love with an Indian woman
    B : Wanted to protest against the economic policies of the Indian government.
    C : Was offered the editorship of Mysindia.
    D : Had been instructed to work towards the goal of inciting a revolution in India.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 95

    The author that A.D. Shroff’s ideas were somewhat at odds with the views of Planning Commission because:

    A : A.D. Shroff was in favour of rigid governmental control over all economic activities.
    B : Shroff had opposed government’s decision to devalue Indian rupee.
    C : The hostility of the government to private entrepreneurs was complained against by A.D. Shroff.
    D : Shroff had been critical of the influence of Soviet academicians over India’s economic policy.


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 96

    The ideological shift of Philip Spratt to the right was caused by:

    A : The demise of the Soviet Union
    B : The start of the weekly called MysIndia.
    C : The books that he encountered in the prison.
    D : The dissolution of his first marriage to his college friend.


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 97

    Select the statement that could be most plausibly inferred from this passage.

    A : Philip Spratt and A.D. Shroff were members of the Forum for Free Enterprise.
    B : The first two Five Year Plans emphasized on the importance of private enterprise as the spearhead of economic growth.
    C : P.C. Mahalanobis had mooted the expulsion of foreign firms like Coca Cola and IBM from India.
    D : The hopes that the licensing regime would be liberalized after the devaluation of India rupee were belied in the aftermath of the split in the Congress Party.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 98

    The author alludes to nationalization of industries in 1969 in order to:

    A : Show the contradictions between AD Shroff’s economic views and the official economic policies of the government of India.
    B : Exemplify the shift of the Indira Gandhi led government to the ‘left’
    C : Demonstrate the ideological changes in the worldview of Philip Spratt.
    D : Highlight the negative political repercussions of the decision to devalue the Indian currency.


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 99

    “Neither Philip Spratt nor A.D. Shroff______ able to convince Mahalanobis.” Select the most appropriate phrase out of the four options for filling the blank space in the aforesaid sentence.

    A : Were
    B : Are
    C : Was
    D : Is


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 100

    The word ‘inveighed’ in this passage means:

    A : Praised
    B : Recited
    C : Proclaimed
    D : Remonstrated


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    .

     Correct answer is : D


  • Passage for Questions 11 to 20
    In Manu Joseph’s debut novel Serious Men, the protagonist, Ayyan Mani; is a sly, scheming Dalit-Buddhist who almost gets away with passing off his partially deaf son, Adi, as a prodigy, a genius who can recite the first 1,000 prime numbers. The garb of satire—where almost every character cuts a sorry figure—gives the author the licence to offer one of the most bleak and pessimistic portrayals of urban Dalits. Despite his savage portrayal of Dalit (and female) characters—or perhaps because of it?—Serious Men has won critical appreciation from a cross-section of readers and critics.

    At a time when a formidable body of Dalit literature—writing by Dalits about Dalit lives—has created a distinct space for itself, how and why is it that a novel such as Serious Men, with its gleefully skewed portrayal of an angry Dalit man, manages to win such accolades? In American literature—and particularly in the case of African-American authors and character—these issues of representation have been debated for decades. But in India, the sustained refusal to address issues related to caste in everyday life—and the continued and unquestioned predominance of a Brahminical stranglehold over cultural production—have led us to a place where non-Dalit portrayal of Dalits in literature, cinema and art remains the norm.

    The journey of modern Dalit literature has been a difficult one. But even though it has not necessarily enjoyed the support of numbers we must engage with what Dalits are writing—not simply for reasons of authenticity, or as a concession to identity politics, but simply because of the aesthetic value of this body of writing, and for the insights it offers into the human condition. In a society that is still largely unwilling to recognize Dalits as equal, rights-bearing human beings, in a society that is inherently indifferent to the everyday violence against Dalits, in a society unwilling to share social and cultural resources equitably with Dalits unless mandated by law (as seen in the anti-reservation discourse), Dalit literature has the potential to humanize non-Dalits and sensitise them to a world into which they have no insight. But before we can understand what Dalit literature is seeking to accomplish, we need first to come to terms with the stranglehold of non-Dalit representations of Dalits.

    Rohinton Mistry’s A Fine Balance, published 15 years ago, chronicles the travails of two Dalit characters— uncle Ishvar and nephew Omprakash—who migrate to Bombay and yet cannot escape brutality. While the present of the novel is set at the time of the Emergency, Ishvar’s father Dukhi belongs to the era of the anticolonial nationalist movement. During one of Dukhi’s visits to the town, he chances upon a meeting of the Indian National Congress, where speakers spread the “Mahatma’s message regarding the freedom struggle, the struggle for justice,” and wiping out “the disease of untouchability, ravaging us for centuries, denying dignity to our fellow human beings.”

    Neither in the 1940s, where the novel’s past is set, nor in the Emergency period of the 1970s—when the minds and bodies Ishvar and Omprakash, are savaged by the state—do we find any mention of a figure like BR Ambedkar or of Dalit movements. In his ‘nationalist’ understanding of modern Indian history, Mistry seems to have not veered too far from the road charted by predecessors like Mulk Raj Anand and Premchand. Sixty years after Premchand, Mistry’s literary imagination seems stuck in the empathy-realism mode, trapping Dalits in abjection. Mistry happily continues the broad stereotype of the Dalit as a passive sufferer, without consciousness of caste politics.


      Question 101

    Which of the following is the closest description of the central argument of this passage:

    A : Manu Joseph’s novel presents a scathing portrayal of Dalits.
    B : Contemporary American literature is very cautious on politically correct representation of minorities.
    C : The last two decades have witnessed the rise of a very vibrant Dalit literature.
    D : Portrayal of Dalits by non-Dalits merely as passive victims has been the dominant norm in Indian literature, cinema and art.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 102

    According to this passage, Premchand and Mulk Raj Anand:

    A : Presented a stereotyped version of Dalit characters in their writings.
    B : Excelled in writing satires on social inequality
    C : Were politically opposed to the views of B.R. Ambedkar
    D : Were closely involved with the leadership of the nationalist movement.


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 103

    The writer refers to the ‘anti-reservation discourse’ in order to argue that:

    A : Dalit literature has had a very difficult journey since its origins. .
    B : Manu Joseph is viscerally opposed to Dalits
    C : Persons belonging to the upper castes are inherently indifferent to routine violence against Dalits.
    D : Indian society is not yet ready to equitably share, on its own, social, cultural and political space with Dalits.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 104

    Which of the following statements is least likely to be inferred from this passage.

    A : The author of Serious Men has used the literary device of satire to present an unflattering picture of women characters.
    B : Issues of representation of minorities have been debated extensively in American literature.
    C : The writer of this passage believes that engagement with Dalits is necessary only because such engagement affirms the importance of identity politics.
    D : The writer believes that Rohinton Mistry presented a stereotypical representation of Dalits character in his book.


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 105

    According to the information available in the passage, the writer attributes the prevalence of representation of Dalits by non-Dalits in literature, art and media to:

    A : The nationalist understanding of Indian history
    B : Marginalization of B.R. Ambedkar from nationalist movement.
    C : The anti-reservation discourse
    D : Brahminical control over cultural production.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 106

    Which of the following is not among the reasons suggested by the writer for engaging with Dalit writing:

    A : Dalit literature has the potential to sensitize non-Dalits about the experiences of the former.
    B : Dalit writing is more authentic than representation of Dalits by non-Dalits.
    C : Dalit literature does not have the support of numbers.
    D : The aesthetic value of Dalit writing.


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    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 107

    Which of the following statement cannot be inferred from the passage:

    A : Upper-castes have dominated the instruments of cultural production in Indian society.
    B : Indian society is unwilling to recognize Dalits as equal, rights bearing human beings.
    C : Dalit writers have carved out a space for writings on Dalit experience and world view.
    D : The judiciary in India, in its opposition to reservation, has betrayed its unwillingness to acknowledge Dalits as equal bearer of rights.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 108

    The writer of this passage is critical of Rohinton Mistry’s A Fine Balance for the reason that:

    A : It is an example of a book of Dalit characters by a Non-Dalit
    B : The book suggests that Dalits are nothing more than passive sufferers without any agency.
    C : The book ignores the everyday violence that Dalits have to confront with.
    D : It bares the passive literary style of the author, Rohinton Mistry.


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    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 109

    Which of the following words would be the best substitute for the word ‘sly’ in this passage.

    A : Bright
    B : wise
    C : devious
    D : dim


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    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 110

    “It is not as if Dalit movements________ not active during the periods that form A Fine Balance’s backdrop.” Select the most appropriate choice to fill in the blank in the above sentence:

    A : is
    B : was
    C : were
    D : are


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : C


  • Passage for Questions 21 to 30
    In recent weeks the writers William Dalrymple and Patrick French, among others, have come before a fusillade of criticism in India, much of it questioning not their facts, not their interpretations, but their foreignness.

    “Who gets to write about India?” The Wall Street Journal asked on Wednesday in its own report on this Indian literary feuding. It is a complicated question, not least because to decide who gets to write about India, you would need to decide who gets to decide who gets to write about India. Rather than conjecturing some Committee for the Deciding of the Deciding of Who Gets to Write About India, it might be easier to let writers write what they please and readers read what they wish.

    The accusations pouring forth from a section of the Indian commentariat are varied. Some criticism is of a genuine literary nature, fair game, customary, expected. But lately a good amount of the reproaching has been about identity.

    In the case of Mr. Dalrymple, a Briton who lives in New Delhi, it is—in the critics’ view—that his writing is an act of re-colonization. In the case of Mr. French, it is that he belongs to a group of foreign writers who use business-class lounges and see some merit in capitalism and therefore do not know the real India, which only the commentarial member in question does.

    What is most interesting about these appraisals is that their essential nature makes reading the book superfluous, as one of my Indian reviewers openly admitted. (His review was not about the book but about his refusal to read the book). The book is not necessary in these cases, for the argument is about who can write about India, not what has been written.

    For critics of this persuasion, India surely seems a lonely land. A country with a millennial history of Hindus, Christians, Jews, Muslims and Buddhists living peaceably together; a country of hundreds of dialects in which so many. Indians are linguistic foreigners to each other, and happily, tolerantly so; a country that welcomes foreign seekers (of yoga poses, of spiritual wisdom, of ancestral roots) with open arms; a country where, outside the elite world of South Delhi and South Bombay, I have not heard an Indian ask whether outsiders have a right to write, think or exist on their soil.

    But it is not just this deep-in-the-bones pluralism that challenges the who-gets-to-write-about-India contingent. It is also that at the very heart of India’s multifarious changes today is this glimmering idea: that Indians must be rewarded for what they do, not who they are.

    Identities you never chose—caste, gender, birth order—are becoming less important determinants of fate. Your deeds—how hard you work, what risks you take—are becoming more important. It is this idea, which I have found pulsating throughout the Indian layers, that leaves a certain portion of the intelligentsia out of sync with the surrounding country. As Mr. French has observed, there is a tendency in some of these writers to value social mobility only for themselves. When the new economy lifts up the huddled masses, then it becomes tawdry capitalism and rapacious imperialism and soulless globalization.

    Fortunately for those without Indian passports, the nativists’ vision of India is under demographic siege. The young and the relentless are India’s future. They could not think more differently from these literatis. They savour the freedom they are gaining to seek their own level in the society and to find their voice; and they tend to be delighted at the thought that some foreigners do the same in India and love their country as much as they do.


      Question 111

    Which of the following statements is least likely to be inferred from the passage:

    A : Younger generations of Indians are more tolerant of foreign scribes who write about their country.
    B : The writer believes that a section of Indian intelligentsia is very hostile to upward economic mobility.
    C : Mr. William Dalrymple has been accused of recolonising India through his writings.
    D : Most of the criticism that has been recently directed at Patrick French has emphasized mainly on the writer’s underwhelming literary style.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 112

    Which of the following would be the best substitute for the word, ‘fusillade’ in the passage?

    A : barrage
    B : breach
    C : temper
    D : row


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 113

    The writer uses the phrase, ‘who gets to write about India contingent’ in this passage to refer to:

    A : Foreign writers who have written books on India.
    B : Critics who have attacked foreign writers writing on India for their mere foreignness.
    C : Elite residents of South Delhi and South Bombay.
    D : Cultural pluralists.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 114

    The writer believes that the most peculiar aspect of the criticisms that Patrick French and William Dalaymple have received is that:

    A : Most such condemnation has emerged from elite Indians.
    B : Such critics are hostile to upward immobility.
    C : These censures are not centered on the books of such writers or their literary styles but are targeted at their identity instead.
    D : These critics ignore the plural ethos of India.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 115

    Which of the following statements can be inferred from the passage:

    A : Ascriptive identities like caste, tribe, etc. are becoming more and more important with the passage of time.
    B : Patrick French believes that the new market friendly economic policies followed for the last decades have resulted in the rise of tawdry capitalism and rapacious imperialism.
    C : The writer is of the opinion that a section of the intelligentsia is divorced from the views of their compatriots.
    D : While India has historically been very hospitable to a variety of religions, it has not been equally open to linguistic foreigners.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 116

    According to the information available in the passage, the writer is of the opinion that:

    A : Writers like Patrick French do not know the real India.
    B : Most of the condemnation heaped on Dalrymple, French and himself has been on expected lines.
    C : India’s reputation of pluralism is cosmetic at best, one that hides deep rooted hatred towards foreigners.
    D : The new generation of Indians have internalized the idea that people should be rewarded for what they do and not who they are.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 117

    The writer refers to the history of Hindus, Christians, Jews, Muslims and Buddhists living peaceably together in India for millions of years in order to:

    A : Show India’s openness to foreigners who have visited Indian in the quest for yoga.
    B : Argue that India is a country of hundreds of dialects.
    C : Demonstrate the religiosity pervading in an average Indian.
    D : India’s deep in the bones pluralism.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 118

    The writer argues that the nature of criticism he, Dalrymple and French have received for their books renders reading their books superfluous because:

    A : Such criticism has been limited to a very small minority of Indians.
    B : These writers are popular among Indian youth, even among those who have not read their books.
    C : The literary styles of these writers are not the sole focus of such criticism.
    D : Such criticism is less about what has been written in their books than about who can write on India.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 119

    According to the passage, the question ‘who gets to write about India’ is complicated because:

    A : India has been historically open to and tolerant of foreign writers and artists.
    B : This issue can be satisfactorily resolved only if we can decide who gets to decide who gets to write about India.
    C : Ascriptive identities are becoming more and more important in a globalized world.
    D : This would result in a shift of attention from what has been written to who has written.


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    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 120

    “But with many outsiders’ India-related books recently hitting bookstores there, the sensitivity—flared into a bout of vigorous literary nativism, with equally vigorous counterpunches.” Select the most appropriate choice to fill in the blank in the above sentence:

    A : has
    B : have
    C : was
    D : did


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : A


  • Instructions (1 to 10): Read the given passage carefully and attempt the questions that follow.
    The work which Gandhiji had taken up was not only regarding the achievement of political freedom but also the establishment of a new social order based on truth and non-violence, unity and peace, equality and universal brotherhood and maximum freedom for all. This unfinished part of his experiment was perhaps even more difficult to achieve than the achievement of political freedom. In the political struggle, the fight was against a foreign power and all one could do was either join it or wish it success and give it his/her moral support. In establishing a social order on this pattern, there was a strong possibility of a conflict arising between diverse groups and classes of our own people. Experience shows that man values his possessions even more than his life because in the former he sees the means for perpetuation and survival of his descendants even after his body is reduced to ashes. A new order cannot be established without radically changing the mind and attitude of men towards property and, at some stage or the other, the 'haves' have to yield place to the 'havenots'. We have seen, in our time, attempts to achieve a kind of egalitarian society and the picture of it after it was achieved. But this was done, by and large, through the use of physical force.
    In the ultimate analysis it is difficult, if not impossible, to say that the instinct to possess has been rooted out or that it will not reappear in an even worse form under a different guise. It may even be that, like a gas kept confined within containers under great pressure, or water held back by a big dam, once the barrier breaks, the reaction will one day sweep back with a violence equal in extent and intensity to what was used to establish and maintain the outward egalitarian form. This enforced egalitarianism contains, in its bosom, the seed of its own destruction.
    The root cause of class conflict is possessiveness or the acquisitive instinct. So long as the ideal that is to be achieved is one of securing the maximum material satisfaction, possessiveness is neither suppressed nor eliminated but grows on what it feeds. Nor does it cease to be possessiveness, whether it is confined to only a few or is shared by many.
    If egalitarianism is to endure, it has to be based not on the possession of the maximum material goods by a few or by all but on voluntary, enlightened renunciation of those goods which cannot be shared by others or can be enjoyed only at the expense of others. This calls for substitution of material values by purely spiritual ones. The paradise of material satisfaction, which is sometimes equated with progress these days, neither spells peace nor progress. Mahatma Gandhi has shown us how the acquisitive instinct inherent in man can be transmuted by the adoption of the ideal of trusteeship by those who 'have' for the benefit of all those who 'have not' so that, instead of leading to exploitation and conflict, it would become a means and incentive for the amelioration and progress of society respectively.


      Question 121

    According to the passage, egalitarianism will not survive if

    A : It is based on voluntary renunciation
    B : It is achieved by resorting to physical force
    C : Underprivileged people are not involved in its establishment.
    D : People's outlook towards it is not radically changed.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 122

    According to the passage, why does man value his possessions more than his life?

    A : He has inherent desire to share his possession with others.
    B : He is endowed with the possessive instinct.
    C : Only his possession helps him earn love and respect from his descendants.
    D : Through his possessions he can preserve his name even after his death.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 123

    According to the passage, which was the unfinished part of Gandhi's experiment?

    A : Educating people to avoid class conflict.
    B : Achieving total political freedom for the country
    C : Establishment of an egalitarian society
    D : Radically changing the mind and attitude of men towards truth and non-violence.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 124

    Which of the following statements is 'not true' in the context of the passage?

    A : True egalitarianism can be achieved by giving up one's possessions under compulsion.
    B : Man values his life more than his possessions.
    C : Possessive instinct is a natural desire of human beings
    D : In the political struggle, the fight was against alien rule.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 125

    According to the passage, true egalitarianism will last only if

    A : It is thrust upon people.
    B : It is based on truth and non-violence.
    C : People inculcate spiritual values instead of material values.
    D : 'Haves' and 'have-nots' live together peacefully


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 126

    According to the passage, people ultimately overturn a social order -------

    A : which is based on coercion and oppression.
    B : which does not satisfy their basic needs
    C : which is based upon conciliation and rapprochement.
    D : which is not congenital to the spiritual values of the people


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 127

    According to the passage, the root cause of class conflict is

    A : The paradise of material satisfaction
    B : Dominant inherent acquisitive instinct in man.
    C : Exploitation of the 'have-nots' by the 'haves'.
    D : A Social order where the unprivileged are not a part of the establishment.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 128

    Which of the following statements is 'not true' in the context of the passage?

    A : A new order can be established by radically changing the outlook of people towards it.
    B : Adoption of the ideal of trusteeship can minimize possessive instinct.
    C : Enforced egalitarianism can be the cause of its own destruction
    D : Ideal of new order is to secure maximum material satisfaction


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 129

    Which of the following conclusions can be deduced from the passage?

    A : A social order based on truth and non-violence alone can help the achievement of political freedom.
    B : After establishing the social order of Gandhiji's pattern, the possibility of a conflict between different classes of society will hardly exist.
    C : It is difficult to change the mind and attitude of men towards property.
    D : In an egalitarian society, material satisfaction can be enjoyed only at the expense of others.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 130

    According to the passage, what does "adoption of the ideal of trusteeship" mean?

    A : Equating peace and progress with material satisfaction.
    B : Adoption of the ideal by the 'haves' for the benefit of ‘have-nots’.
    C : Voluntary enlightened remuneration of the possessive instinct by the privileged class.
    D : Substitution of spiritual values by material ones by those who live in the paradise of material satisfaction.


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : B


  • Instructions (11 to 15): Choose the correct synonym out of the four choices given.

      Question 131

    Lethargy

    A : Serenity
    B : listlessness
    C : impassivity
    D : laxity


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 132

    Emaciated

    A : tall
    B : languid
    C : very thin
    D : wise


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 133

    Latent

    A : conceled
    B : apparent
    C : lethargic
    D : prompt


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 134

    Sporadic

    A : epidmic
    B : whirling
    C : occasional
    D : stangant


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 135

    Compedium

    A : summary
    B : index
    C : reference
    D : collection


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D


  • Instructions (16 to 25): Choose the correct option out of the four choices given.

      Question 136

    Give an example pertinent ______________ the case.

    A : with
    B : on
    C : for
    D : to


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 137

    My voice reverberated _____________ the walls of the castle.

    A : with
    B : from
    C : in
    D : on


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : B




  •   Question 138

    The reward was not commensurate _________ the work done by us.

    A : for
    B : on
    C : with
    D : order


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 139

    Our tragic experience in the recent past provides an index _______ the state of lawlessness in this region.

    A : of
    B : in
    C : at
    D : by


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 140

    Your conduct smacks ___________recklessness.

    A : of
    B : with
    C : from
    D : in


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 141

    A good judge never gropes ____________the conclusion.

    A : to
    B : at
    C : on
    D : for


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 142

    Nobody in our group is a genius _________winning friends and in convincing people.

    A : for
    B : in
    C : of
    D : at


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 143

    If you are averse _________recommending my name, you should not hesitate to admit it.

    A : about
    B : for
    C : to
    D : against


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 144

    Religious leaders should not delve ________ politics.

    A : in
    B : with
    C : at
    D : into


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 145

    What you say has hardly any bearing ________ the lives of tribals.

    A : about
    B : for
    C : on
    D : with


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : C


  • Instruction (26 to 30): Select the correct meaning of the italicized idioms and phrases out of the four choices given.

      Question 146

    He burnt his fingers by interfering in his neighbor’s affair.

    A : got himself into trouble
    B : burnt himself
    C : got himself insulted
    D : got rebuked


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : A




  •   Question 147

    Mr. Gupta, who is one of the trustees of a big charity, is suspected of feathering his own nest.

    A : being lazy in doing his work
    B : being too generous
    C : neglecting his job
    D : making money unfairly


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 148

    Mrs. Hashmi has been in the blues for the last several weeks.

    A : abroad
    B : unwell
    C : depressed
    D : penniless


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : C




  •   Question 149

    For the first week, the apprentice felt like a fish out of water.

    A : frustated
    B : homeless
    C : disappointed
    D : uncomfortable


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : D




  •   Question 150

    For the first week, the apprentice felt like a fish out of water.

    A : become abnormal
    B : appear arrogant
    C : indulge in dreams
    D : hate others


  •  
    .

     Correct answer is : B


  • MY REPORT
    TOTAL = 150
    ANSWERED =
    CORRECT / TOTAL = /150
    POSITIVE SCORE =
    NEGATIVE SCORE =
    FINAL SCORE =